Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Alopecia Totalis PIC

Alopecia Totalis (AT): AT is an auto-immune disorder which results in the total loss of hair, but only on the scalp. It is somewhat of an intermediary condition between Alopecia Areata which is patchy scalp hair loss, and Alopecia Universalis which extends to total body hair loss. AT usually appears in two types: One being a fairly sudden and complete loss of all head hair. The other being a slower form which originates as Alopecia Areata (patchy loss) and advances to complete scalp hair loss. In this sense it is sometimes tied to Alopecia Areata (patchy loss), but not all the time.Patients with alopecia areata lose hair on their scalp in smooth round patches typically causing bald spots about an inch (2cm) across.

Most sufferers are children and young adults under the age of 40, though it can affect people of all ages. It can also affect the the nails, giving them a ridged, pitted or brittle appearance. According to statistics, 2% of men and 1% of women in western society suffer from some form of Alopecia Areata. About 2% of those have Totalis or Universalis. This means that about 1 in every 125,000 men and 1 in every 250,000 women have Alopecia Totalis or Universalis.

The main treatment for Alopecia Totalis are therapies which focus on immunomodulation, such as glucocorticoid injections, anthralin, or glucocorticoids taken orally. We have heard reports from some that years of steroid therapy can put the condition into remission. Years of steroid therapy is not always enjoyable however, as there are side effects. It is important to comment that Rogaine (Minoxidil) is not effective for those with Alopecia Totalis. Some treatments which have been considered include Methotrexate, a treatment for autoimmune disorders, and corticosteroids have been proposed as treatments.

Several genes have been studied and quite a bit of research has focused on the human leukocyte antigen. Two studies demonstrated that human leukocyte antigen DQ3 (DQB1*03) was found in more than 80% of patients with Alopecia Areata, which suggests that it can be a marker for general susceptibility to Alopecia Areata. The studies also found that HLA DQ7 (DQB1*0301) and human leukocyte antigen DR4 (DRB1*0401) were found quite a bit more often in patients with Alopecia Totalis (AT) and Alopecia Universalis (AU).

1-alopecia totalis is not a painful disease and does not make people feel sick.
2-It is not contagious, and people who have the disease are usually otherwise
3-It has no effect on life expectancy, and will not interfere with your ability to
pursue a normal lifestyle.
4-Returning to your faith can play a major role in understanding what is going on.

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